Payback time

The best-paid engineers and technical professionals answering our 2007 Salary Survey are growing more numerous and collecting bigger bonuses, while their lower-paid colleagues are decreasing.

By Jim Montague

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three weeks (33.2%)

three weeks (32.4%)

four weeks (30.6%)

Job description

engineering, design, construction (33.1%)

engineering, design, construction (38.1%)

engineering, design, construction (45%)

Industry

chemical (16.2%)

food and beverage (13.8%)

chemical (19%)

Years at present firm

11-20; more than 20 (24.1%)

11-20 (25.5%)

11-20 (25.6%); more than 20 (26.8%)

Jobs in career

two (25%)

two (27.2%)

two (23.1%)

Years in control

11-20 (30.2%)

11-20 (34.8%)

11-20 (31.7%)

Education

four-year undergraduate (48.9%)

four-year undergraduate (53.2%)

four-year undergraduate (54.1%)

Degree

other, mostly mechanical engineering (36.3%)

electrical engineering (38.3%)

other, mostly mechanical engineering (37.1%)

Residency

U.S. (98.3%)

U.S. (97.4%)

U.S. (98%)

Gender

male (94.6%)

male (94.9%)

male (93.6%)

Ethnicity

white (86%)

white (88.9%)

white (87.9%)

Marital status

married (84.6%)

married (90.5%)

married (85.5%)

Children

yes (83.6%)

yes (84.1%)

yes (86.3%)

While the survey’s middle-aged respondents reported being collectively younger last year, their average age snapped back up in 2007. In fact, those aged 46-55 years increased to 42% in 2007 from 33.1% in 2006, while those aged 36-45 years decreased to 27.6% in 2007 from 36.6% in 2006. Once again, respondents 26-35 years old and those over 55 years remained relatively constant at just over 9% and 19%, respectively, though the youngsters decreased two points and the old guys increased one point.

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