2009

21-40 of 71 < first | | | last >
  • Signal Isolators, Converters and Interfaces: The ‘Ins’ and ‘Outs’

    The white paper features extensive information on signal isolation and conversion, the instrument selection process, and effective applications. It includes pop-up “Isolator Selection Hints,” links to data sheets and to helpful areas on Moore Industries’ web site. The white paper has a tutorial on the basics of signal isolation and signal conversion. The guide moves through more complex topics such as area isolation and splitting a signal, and includes sections on HART isolators and multi-channel isolators. This document provides information on environmental factors to consider when selecting an isolator.

    Moore Industries-International, Inc.
    01/15/2009
  • Shaft Grounding – Fulfilling the Promise of Variable Frequency Drives

    With the rising cost of energy, the use of variable frequency drives (VFDs) is growing at an increasing rate. By optimizing the frequency of a three-phase alternating-current (AC) induction motor’s voltage supply, a VFD controls the motor’s speed and torque while providing energy savings. And, these energy savings can be quite substantial — 20% or more — making VFDs a “green” solution as well as a wise money-saving investment.

    However, in order to be truly “green,” a technology must be sustainable as well as energy efficient. Yet the currents induced on motor shafts by VFDs can wreak havoc with motor bearings, dramatically shortening motor life and severely diminishing the reliability of systems. To mitigate these currents and realize the full potential of VFDs, a cost-effective method of shaft grounding is essential.

    Adam Willwerth, Development Manager, Electro Static Technology
    02/02/2009
  • Shaft Grounding &#8212; Fulfilling the Promise of Variable Frequency Drives

    With the rising cost of energy, the use of variable frequency drives (VFDs) is growing at an increasing rate. By optimizing the frequency of a three-phase alternating-current (AC) induction motor’s voltage supply, a VFD controls the motor’s speed and torque while providing energy savings. And, these energy savings can be quite substantial —— 20% or more —— making VFDs a “green” solution as well as a wise money-saving investment.

    However, in order to be truly “green,” a technology must be sustainable as well as energy efficient.

    Adam Willwerth, Electro Static Technology
    04/17/2009
  • Securing the Modern Electric Grid from Physical and Cyber Attacks

    Statement for the Record, July 21, 2009 Hearing before the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, Science and Technology.

    I appreciate the opportunity to provide the following statement for the record. I have spent more than thirty-five years working in the commercial power industry designing, developing, implementing, and analyzing industrial instrumentation and control systems. I hold two patents on industrial control systems, and am a Fellow of the International Society of Automation. I have performed cyber security vulnerability assessments of power plants, substations, electric utility control centers, and water systems. I am a member of many groups working to improve the reliability and availability of critical infrastructures and their control systems.

    On October 17, 2007, I testified to this Subcommittee on "Control Systems Cyber Security—The Need for Appropriate Regulations to Assure the Cyber Security of the Electric Grid."

    On March 19, 2009, I testified to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on "Control Systems Cyber Security—The Current Status of Cyber Security of Critical Infrastructures."

    I will provide an update on cyber security of the electric system including adequacy of the NERC CIPs and my views on Smart Grid cyber security. I will also provide my recommendations for DOE, DHS, and Congressional action to help secure the electric grid from cyber incidents.

    Joe Weiss, PE, CISM. Applied Control Solutions, LLC
    07/22/2009
  • Safeguarding Your Plant Automation Systems with Change Management

    The increased use of plant floor automation to achieve production goals has created a dependency on PLCs, PC control systems and programmable automation. These devices and their logic programs are costly to develop but vital to the running of the plant, and are viewed by most companies as corporate assets. It is incumbent on plant and corporate management to insure that proper safeguards are in place to protect and manage change in these assets. This paper examines the sources and types of changes that take place in plant automation environments, and the considerations and approaches necessary to safeguard your automation systems through the effective use of a Change Management System (CMS).

    MDT Software, Gary Gillespie
    01/15/2009
  • Risk Control Hierarchy Clarifies Electrical Safety

    A clear and realistic set of objectives goes a long way in driving continuous improvements in electrical safety. Resources can be allocated and priorities can be defined once objectives are set. The risk control hierarchy (RCH) in the ANSI-Z10 standard provides electrical safety professionals with an excellent roadmap for setting the right safety objectives that result in the reduction of electrical risks. RCH helps improve a plant electrical safety program and inspires manufactures to improve their electrical equipment designs. RCH provides a mean to measure the effectiveness of an electrical safety initiative much the same way a project management uses financial measurements to evaluate a project.

    Phil Allen the President of Grace Engineered Products Inc.
    03/16/2009
  • Real-Time Energy Measurement and Empowerment

    Business leaders in today’s manufacturing industries are facing a key issue, lack of visibility into plant business performance in real-time. Thus, real-time information for plant costs, production value, and contribution margin are generally not available to key decision-makers within the operation. Energy management is a key area where the lack of real-time information has a significant impact. Most companies still do not have a clear understanding of the relationship between energy consumption and the impact on real-time costs. This lack of critical information makes it difficult to make informed decisions as energy-related pricing and costs change frequently, affecting manufacturing business performance. Energy prices comprise a large percentage of variable costs in most operations. The dynamic nature of their impact on the business further confounds the situation owing to factors such as:

    - New green energy sources
    - Complex and fast changing energy market rates and metering dynamics
    - Multiple fuel-burning choices
    - New and changing environmental requirements

    During these difficult economic times, this problem is magnified and presents a significant challenge to improving efficiencies and managing environmental responsibilities. Today’s business world requires better business information of the manufacturing environment, propagated to all relevant people within the organization to enable and empower better decision-making to improve business performance. Invensys Process Systems (IPS) Real-Time Energy Measurement and Real-Time Energy Empowerment are an effective solution to this problem.

    Watch this video
    New Information and Resources on Real-Time Energy Management Solutions Now Available From IPS
    Learn how real-time energy management can reduce energy costs and consumption.

    Russ Barr, Invensys Process Systems
    04/28/2009
  • QNI Uses the OSIsoft PI System to Control Refinery Operations and Gain 41 Percent IRR in 3.5 Years

    Until a few years ago, QNI’s cobalt/nickel refinery in Yabulu, Australia, used manual process-recording methods. Process engineers found it difficult to determine the influence of variables on product quality and to generate timely reports for management. Management was frustrated by the challenges of accounting for monthly reconciled recovery, determining where losses occurred and tracking quality by batch.

    To gain control over its operations and processes, QNI needed to track key performance indicators (KPIs) and overall equipment effectiveness (OEE). Though QNI already had a functioning ABB distributed control system, it couldn’t store process data for more than three weeks — not really long enough to track production records and monitor KPIs. Faced with ISO 9001 compliance and the need to implement Six Sigma in its manufacture of high-grade nickel and cobalt products, QNI chose OSIsoft’s solution to combine production data from its six business units with their total of eight separate control rooms.

    OSIsoft
    05/22/2009
  • Public Service Electric and Gas Deploys PI System as Foundation for CMMS System

    Public Service Electric and Gas implemented the SAP PM (Plant Maintenance) system in 2000 to enhance the efficiency of its transmission and distribution equipment maintenance. While this application did improve maintenance systems, it did not provide the proactive, predictive approach to T&D maintenance that the company wanted.

    A special project was begun in 2001 to design and implement a computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) that would allow PSE&G to monitor equipment status and handle maintenance procedures using a condition-based approach rather than a calendar-based system. The PI System from OSIsoft in San Leandro, Calif., is the foundation on which PSE&G’s engineering and IT staffs created their CMMS solution. The system proposal called for a full ROI by 2005, but the system was launched in early 2002 and began delivering cost savings in its first year. It also is extending the life of aging equipment through more efficient monitoring of performance.

    OSIsoft
    05/22/2009
  • Process Safety in Specialty Chemicals: Turning Industry Challenges Into Opportunities

    The need: Lower life cycle costs and better information flow. The solution: New standards offer more choices for integrating safety and process control

    The specialty chemical industry is facing a number of difficult challenges, including increasingly stringent safety and compliance mandates, higher energy and feedstock prices, and aging plants and equipment – all intensified by global competition. Compounding these challenges is the expanding breadth of specialty chemical product categories, forcing manufacturers to dedicate major resources and continuously innovate to maintain market share and capitalize on new opportunities.

    Despite the size of the industry and the increase in worldwide demand for all types of specialty chemicals, margins must be managed closely due to rising costs, more demanding customers, and the fact that all products – no matter how innovative – eventually go off-patent and face stiff competition. While operating a chemical plant is tough business, opportunities exist for companies to optimize their investments and improve both productivity and their financial performance.

    Risks prevail wherever people store, process or handle hazardous or toxic materials. In the specialty chemical industry, these risks are compounded because the hazard has the potential to impact a numerous of people. A spill of a toxic agent or explosion could be hazardous to a population within a plant or the surrounding area. One growing area of focus in recent years is the critical value of safety in protecting people, and helping safeguard the environment and plant assets, as well as reducing lifecycle costs.

    This paper explores how changes in industry standards and technology developments are expanding how safety systems are applied in specialty chemical applications. It also examines the operational and competitive advantages driving the trend toward separate yet interoperable safety and process control platforms with common development tools. These benefits include reduced life cycle costs, expanded access to process data and improved plant-wide integration.

    Rockwell Automation
    04/17/2009
  • Process Analytics Finds Process Problems

    Process Analytics and Intelligence—sometimes called Manufacturing Intelligence—has transformed the way companies produce goods, understand their manufacturing processes, and ensure a quality product in ways we could not have foreseen ten years ago.

    Real-time Analytics have replaced the legacy concept of running reports. Reports that represent a static picture of a process at a fixed point in time are great tools for compliance audits and long term warranty analysis. However, they may not accurately represent the "as-is" state of a process. Reports showing large amounts of data can be difficult to interpret. There are often limitations in how the report data can be drilleddown and viewed.

    With today's large volumes of data, there's a wealth of information that can be gained about the process. But how can this data be captured, managed and retrieved in a way that presents the information in an up-to-theminute easy to understand format? Real-time Analytics provides the techniques and solutions that address this problem. Instead of users having to interpret the data, it's presented in a graphical form enabling them to easily drill down to explore the data in real-time.

    This white paper discusses how Process Analytics is implemented and utilized. Ways of managing and distributing Process Analytics to the organization are presented.

    By Jack Wilkins, Canary Labs
    08/20/2009
  • Planning and Developing Effective Emergency Mass Notification Strategies for Hazardous Industrial Applications in the Post 9/11 Era.

    Emergency mass notification for hazardous industrial processing operations has traditionally focused on audible and visual signaling devices such as sirens, horns, warning lights, beacons, public address and intercom systems. And the extent of the ability to quickly alert anyone outside the plant—including fire, police and medical first responders—was until relatively recently limited to auto-dialing telecommunications. On September 11, 2001, however, everything changed.

    The horrific terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City dramatically accelerated the evolution of mass notification strategies and technologies. This has been particularly evident in the case of hazardous industrial applications, and resulted in plant safety being suddenly and inextricably interwoven with critical security and detection functions. The threat of terrorist attacks has most definitely prompted industrial plant managers to completely re-evaluate their approach to emergency mass notification—both internally and externally. And for obvious reasons, this comprehensive re-examination of mass notification requirements has had a substantial impact on facilities that process, use, store and distribute hazardous chemical materials.

    Compliance with directives from government agencies is clearly one of the driving forces propelling this comprehensive re-assessment of emergency mass notification planning, systems and resources. Also at play is the subsequent proliferation of new software-driven technology riding on existing network topologies; and the deployment of seamless, multi-device, interoperable communications both within and outside the facility. Finally, there is the growing trend towards integrated systems, which in this instance encompasses the integration of disparate mass-notification devices and communication systems to achieve the highest possible levels of reliability and monitoring through redundancy and operational simplicity.

    Federal Signal
    11/23/2009
  • PI System Helps Methanol Producer Improve Quality and Performance, Stay Competitive

    Since 1997, the Chilean-based operations of Methanex, the world’s largest producer and marketer of methanol, have been using the PI System from OSIsoft to improve product quality. With the success of using real-time data to improve operations, the company has recently begun to implement OSIsoft’s PI System as a strategic initiative to more fully integrate and distribute operations information throughout the company for better competitive advantages.

    OSIsoft
    05/15/2009
  • Overcoming Concerns about Wireless PACs and I/O in Industrial Automation

    Industrial Automation Flirts with Wireless
    The automation industry increasingly finds wireless attractive, and for several reasons.
    - Running a wired network incurs significant labor and material costs, while wireless networks cost far less.
    - Wireless offers connectivity for remote areas or areas not currently served by wired networks.
    - Wireless controllers and I/O can manage devices and processes even in inaccessible areas, or areas where network wiring is difficult or impossible to install.
    - And wireless can offer a way to provide proof-of-concept for a new project before incurring the expense of a wired network.

    For all these reasons, automation engineers are beginning to seriously consider wireless solutions (specifically WLAN, wireless Ethernet, or Wi-Fi) for all or part of their applications.

    But with all these good reasons to use wireless, several concerns remain. Among them are security, network performance and reliability, availability and cost of I/O components, and the necessity of choosing between wired and wireless solutions up front.

    Opto22
    04/23/2009
  • OSIsoft Helps the Roche Group Employ Real-Time Performance Management and Increase Operational Efficiencies

    The Roche Group maintains three types of manufacturing facilities: chemical, biotech and galenical. To sustain growth in an increasingly competitive global business environment, the company sought a technically superior information platform that would enable operational improvements in efficiency, performance, quality and compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP).

    Roche considered the PI System to be the best foundation to gain visibility into operational performance and enable faster response time and analysis for more cost-effective actions. As a successful global initiative, PI allows management to make more effective business decisions based on reliable and current information. Local plant management can optimize process operations to respond to real-world product demand. Operators, engineers, chemists and managers can now plan better, improve production and increase efficiency.

    OSIsoft
    05/22/2009
  • OSIsoft Helps MWRA Improve Real-Time Plant Performance, Aid Boston Harbor Cleanup

    A wastewater treatment organization in Massachusetts has been implementing OSIsoft’s PI System (PI) as the core of an enterprise-wide solution. With the help of the real-time data collected and distributed by PI, the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA) is able to achieve real-time notification of events to the employees who need to know; real-time pricing of power in order to determine the most cost-effective approach to on-site power usage; deliver accurate and timely compliance reporting to local and federal agencies; and, perhaps best of all, play a key role in improving the quality of the environment in Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay.

    OSIsoft
    05/15/2009
  • OSIsoft Helps Innovene Run More Efficiently: Analysis Framework Expands Analysis Capability

    In 2000, Innovene’s Sarralbe, France plant updated its antiquated legacy system infrastructure with the OSIsoft PI System to provide real-time and historical information. Next, the company wanted to increase operational and development efficiencies. They sought to avoid multiple manual inputs and to minimize custom application development.

    In 2004, the Innovene, Sarralbe site implemented OSIsoft’s Analysis Framework (AF) for faster application configuration to help employees analyze and optimize processes more efficiently. Innovene was impressed with the OSIsoft suite of products, and they were convinced that AF could effectively leverage the power of the new infrastructure.

    OSIsoft
    04/24/2009
  • Optimizing Solar Thermal Performance with Data Loggers

    This white paper discusses how solar thermal systems, with the help of portable data loggers, can be optimized to deliver the financial benefits residential and commercial users hope to achieve through their investments.

    Onset
    11/02/2009
  • Open Architectures to Improve Plant Visibility and Performances

    Manufacturing companies have invested large amounts of money in industrial automation infrastructures, but many have yet to realize the full value from their investment as many of these infrastructures remain islands of automation; information silos disconnected from other systems, including business systems. This paper discusses some of the options available for integrating automation islands and for distributing information at any level in the organization. Real world examples will be presented to show benefits provided by open architectures.

    Integration Objects
    03/11/2009
  • OPC Technology Helps Maximize Return on Process Historian Assets

    Off-line analysis of historical process data is an integral part of process optimization and production tracking. OPC helps maximize return on process history investments. OPC not only provides a standardized mechanism for collection of real time process data, it also enables multi-vendor historical analysis solutions. OPC facilitates highly scalable multi-vendor distributed historian architectures. OPC Data Access (DA) and OPC Historical Data Access (HDA) are two specifications that can be combined to solve many of the process history problems.

    Matrikon OPC
    03/30/2009
21-40 of 71 < first | | | last >