White Papers

on 'Motors'

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  • Technology Transfer Brings New Life to Electric Control Valve Actuation

    The limitations of traditional electric actuators have an impact on the life of the system. The most common problem is exceeding the rated duty cycle, causing the motor to burn out. A study done by ExxonMobil and presented in October 2012 at Coking.Com identified wear issues. Download this white paper to learn more.

    Exlar
    04/14/2014
  • Know Your TCO: A Look at Medium-Voltage VFDs

    In this white paper, we analyze what factors contribute to TCO (total cost of ownership) of a drive, how to calculate the NPV (net present value), explain the inverse relationship between reliability and TCO and how longevity of product and customer service and support affect TCO.

    Siemens
    10/28/2013
  • Drivers - The Unsung Hero of Automation

    What features should you look for in a driver? It isn't just about getting data from point A to point B. Drivers need to be designed for performance, ease of use, reliability and optimum operation in the event of a disruption in operation. The latter being a major point, often overlooked in the development of communications.

    Kepware
    06/28/2011
  • 10 Essential Technologies for High–Performance Motion Control

    Motion controllers have incorporated key technologies over the years to meet the increasing demands of high-performance applications such as profile cutting and wafer inspection. This document covers the top 10 key technologies that impact your high-performance motion control applications.

    National Instruments
    08/25/2010
  • Present State and a Futuristic Vision of Motor Drive Technology

    One of the main driving force behind the industrial revolution was the invention of the electric motor more than a century ago. Its widespread use for all kinds of mechanical motion has made life simple and has ultimately aided the advancement of human kind. The advent of the inverter that facilitated speed and torque control of AC motors has propelled the use of electric motor to new realms that was inconceivable just a mere 30 years ago. Advances in power semiconductors along with digital controls have enabled realization of motor drives that are robust and can control position and speed to a high degree of precision. Use of AC motor drives has also resulted in energy savings and improved system efficiency.

    Yaskawa Electric Corporation has been at the forefront of technology, creating reliable drives that consistently push the envelope of engineering achievement. This paper reviews Yaskawa's role in the development and application of the inverter technology to AC motor drives and introduces some futuristic vision for the motor drive technology. The development of more efficient, more powerful electric motor drives to power the demands of the future is important for achieving energy savings, environmentally harmonious drives that do not pollute the electrical power system, and improving productivity. Yaskawa wants to be an integral part of this future and hopes to contribute significantly to achieve this.

    Mahesh M. Swamy and Tsuneo Kume, Yaskawa Electric America
    05/17/2010
  • General Purpose Permanent Magnet Motor Drive without Speed and Position Sensor

    1. Power consumption by electric motors
    Worldwide, about two-thirds of the electricity is consumed by motors used in powers industrial facilities. According to DOE report, the motor systems are responsible for 63% of all electricity consumed by U.S. industry and electric bill represents more than 97% of total motor operating costs.

    Rapidly increasing energy cost and strong global interest in reducing carbon dioxide emissions are encouraging industry to pay more attention to high-efficiency motors.

    Permanent Magnet (PM) motors have higher efficiency than induction motors because there are no I2R losses of the rotor. But widespread use of the PM motors has been discouraged by price and requirement of a speed encoder.

    Recent release of low-cost high-performance CPUs and establishment of the speed sensorless control theory (hereinafter referred to as an open-loop vector control method) enables the advent of a general-purpose open-loop control PM drive. In this white paper, the open-loop PM motor control technology is introduced and its characteristics and major application fields are described.

    Jun Kang, Yaskawa Electric America
    05/17/2010
  • Advances in Low Voltage Motor Control Center (MCC) Technology Help Reduce Arc-Flash Hazards and Minimize Risks

    Selecting the right MCC equipment leads to improved plant safety, helping protect people and capital investments.

    Measures to increase equipment and personnel safety in manufacturing are reflected in new approaches and technologies designed to help minimize the risk of workplace dangers. One rapidly growing area of focus is reducing the potentially serious hazards associated with arc-flash events. This white paper examines the causes of arc flash, discusses the standards guiding arc-flash safety and details the role arc-resistant motor control centers (MCCs) play in helping contain arc energy. It also highlights the key features of an effective arc-resistant MCC design.

    Managing safety hazards and reducing risks are top priorities for manufacturers across all sectors of industry. With a multitude of potential dangers and new ones continuously emerging, companies must be diligent in their ongoing efforts while considering new approaches and technologies to improve plant safety. One rapidly growing area of focus is implementing techniques and practices designed to reduce hazards and minimize risk for workers who must enter an area with an electrical arc-flash potential.

    Rockwell Automation
    04/07/2010
  • Building a Reliable VFD System

    This white paper examines the benefits of variable-frequency drives (VFDs) and special considerations that must be given to their design, installation and operation. The paper also reviews and evaluates the various cable types typically used in VFD systems and conditions affecting their performance such as radiated and common-mode noise.

    Belden
    07/08/2009
  • Learn How an AC VFD Works to Better Understand Its Efficiencies

    This white paper will describe how and why an AC variable–frequency drive must simultaneously control output frequency and voltage to efficiently control the speed of a three–phase induction motor. Highly educational and practical.

    Yaskawa Electric
    05/13/2009
  • Shaft Grounding &#8212; Fulfilling the Promise of Variable Frequency Drives

    With the rising cost of energy, the use of variable frequency drives (VFDs) is growing at an increasing rate. By optimizing the frequency of a three-phase alternating-current (AC) induction motor’s voltage supply, a VFD controls the motor’s speed and torque while providing energy savings. And, these energy savings can be quite substantial —— 20% or more —— making VFDs a “green” solution as well as a wise money-saving investment.

    However, in order to be truly “green,” a technology must be sustainable as well as energy efficient.

    Adam Willwerth, Electro Static Technology
    04/17/2009
  • Shaft Grounding – Fulfilling the Promise of Variable Frequency Drives

    With the rising cost of energy, the use of variable frequency drives (VFDs) is growing at an increasing rate. By optimizing the frequency of a three-phase alternating-current (AC) induction motor’s voltage supply, a VFD controls the motor’s speed and torque while providing energy savings. And, these energy savings can be quite substantial — 20% or more — making VFDs a “green” solution as well as a wise money-saving investment.

    However, in order to be truly “green,” a technology must be sustainable as well as energy efficient. Yet the currents induced on motor shafts by VFDs can wreak havoc with motor bearings, dramatically shortening motor life and severely diminishing the reliability of systems. To mitigate these currents and realize the full potential of VFDs, a cost-effective method of shaft grounding is essential.

    Adam Willwerth, Development Manager, Electro Static Technology
    02/02/2009
  • Integrated Electrical and Automation Systems

    As process plants get larger and more complex, automation systems must handle an ever-increasing number of signals. At the same time, the number of electric consumers increases, making an electrical control system essential. The electrical control system is an automation system in itself, providing an interface between the process control and the electric consumers and actuators. ABB takes responsibility for all these systems and their integration. By letting ABB handle the integration and all the interfaces, customers benefit from faster project execution, reduced re-engineering, higher quality and higher operational efficiency.

    ABB
    09/05/2008
  • GE Fanuc’s Proficy Becomes Reality for Collaborative Process Automation

    It is a significant competitive advantage for an automation supplier to offer an open and collaborative production environment that embraces standards and can address the full scope of automation and control applications from process to discrete and motion applications. Download this white paper to learn more about collaborative process automation.

    GE Fanuc
    03/10/2008
  • Using the NI 17xx Smart Camera Direct Drive Lighting Controller

    This application note discusses considerations when selecting lighting equipment and demonstrates how to utilize the Direct Drive lighting controller feature on the NI 17xx Smart Camera with LabVIEW or Vision Builder for Automated Inspection.

    National Instruments
    03/10/2008
  • The four-fold method of noise and vibration control

    This White Paper on noise and vibration control will help control engineers get a better understanding of how passive acoustical systems can best be used to improve instrument designs at the lowest cost.

    E-A-R Specialty Composites
    05/17/2005
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