White Papers

on 'PLCs & PACs'

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  • When to Use Multi-Function Safety Relays

    Often the Best Choice for Applications Where SingleFunction Relays Aren’t Capable Enough and a Safety-Rated PLC is Overkill

    Lenny Filipkowski, AutomationDirect
    07/23/2014
  • Redundancy for OPC

    Redundancy in a process control system means that some or all of the system is duplicated, or redundant. The goal is to eliminate, as much as possible, any single point of failure. When a piece of equipment or a communication link goes down, a similar or identical component is ready to take over.

    Robert McIlvride, Andew Thomas, Cogent Real‐Time Systems Inc.
    04/21/2014
  • PAC Controller Redundancy

    Applications that require high availability, advanced data handling and superior communication capability are a good fit for PAC redundancy. This white paper looks at the benefits of redundancy, options, and implementation details.

    Advantech
    12/09/2013
  • ExperTune's Best Practices for Controller Tuning

    Controller tuning can be accomplished quickly and accurately using proven techniques. While many engineers and technicians resort to "tune by feel," most will admit that this approach yields inconsistent results. These best practices help to ensure that controller tuning changes from "part art, part science," to a very consistent scientific approach.

    ExperTune
    07/09/2013
  • Security for Industrial Automation and Control Systems

    The security of industrial automation and control systems becomes increasingly critical as different networks are connected and systems are integrated in a collaborative manufacturing environment. For industrial automation and control systems the potential impact of an attack maybe more serious than for computer systems in general. Users of industrial automation and control systems need to pay correspondingly increased attention to these issues.

    ABB
    05/15/2013
  • I/O Solutions for Temperature Monitoring

    Sensors used for temperature monitoring and data acquisition can be quite varied. Applications ranging from simple room temperature monitoring to highly sophisticated batch process control can all be highly dependent on obtaining accurate temperature readings. The primary types of sensors used for this purpose are resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), thermocouples, integrated circuit temperature detectors (ICTDs), thermistors, and infrared sensors.

    Opto 22
    05/15/2013
  • Why Migrate Your Legacy DCS?

    Making the decision to migrate your legacy DCS is a significant one. But increased productivity, greater efficiencies, lower maintenance costs and less downtime can't be ignored. Our tools can help. Learn more about DCS migration special edition IPDF, whitepapers, videos and more.

    Rockwell Automation
    02/01/2013
  • Why Migrate Legacy Control Systems?

    Justifying automation projects today is extraordinarily difficult. Honeywell offers a wide range of migration options and is the only vendor that continues to support 30+ year-old control systems. These migration solutions provide access to up-to-date technology without having to "rip and replace."

    Honeywell Process Solutions
    10/26/2012
  • Upgrading Your DCS: Why You Might Need to Do It Sooner Than You Think

    As the next generation of distributed control systems (DCS) becomes firmly established in the marketplace, each manufacturer must face the issue of upgrading. DCS vendors already have plans to phase out support of many current platforms, so it's critical that you develop your own plan for moving forward. The most proactive plants already have a plan in place, while others might continue scavenging for spare parts to keep their existing controllers alive for as long as possible. Of course, every control system has a limited lifespan and must be upgraded eventually. The big question is when. Download this white paper to learn when you should upgrade your DCS.

    Maverick Technologies
    06/04/2012
  • Signal Conditioning and PC-Based Data Acquisition Handbook

    The third edition of this handbook has been totally revised to include new chapters on Electrical Measurements, Vibration and Sound, Displacement and Position Sensing, and Transducer Electronic Data Sheets (TEDS). It also includes several new subjects and expands on selected items including Fundamental Signal Conditioning.

    All chapters have been enhanced to address more practical applications than theoretical measurement issues. They cover a major topic with sufficient detail to help readers understand the basic principles of sensor operation and the need for careful system interconnections. The handbook also discusses key issues concerning the data acquisition system's multiplexing and signal conditioning circuits, and analog-to-digital converters. These three functions establish the overall accuracy, resolution, speed, and sensitivity of data acquisition systems and determine how well the systems perform.

    Data acquisition systems measure, store, display, and analyze information collected from a variety of devices. Most measurements require a transducer or a sensor, a device that converts a measurable physical quantity into an electrical signal. Examples include temperature, strain, acceleration, pressure, vibration, and sound. Yet others are humidity, flow, level, velocity, charge, pH, and chemical composition.

    Measurement Computing
    04/23/2012
  • Convergence and the Programmable Automation Controller

    Ensuring your PAC-based control system is an integrated, robust and flexible information producer helps improve business performance, lower costs and uncover unique opportunities for competitiveness.

    All companies seek ways to make their businesses grow for the long-term. Ask any manufacturer today what he/she needs in an increasingly challenging economy. It's likely to include cutting costs, improving yield, increasing functionality and becoming more competitive in the global marketplace.

    Manufacturing convergence helps companies meet these business drivers - globalization, innovation, productivity and sustainability - by more closely aligning manufacturing technologies and production system operations with the rest of the enterprise. This convergence is enabled throughout the manufacturing environment with the technologies of convergence - control, power, information and communication.

    Rockwell Automation
    03/24/2010
  • OPC: The Ins and Outs to What It's About (The Every Man's Guide to OPC)

    In today's world, automation is used prominently in every major industry. While different industries often use different specialized devices, control systems and applications, they all share a common rapidly growing challenge - how to share data amongst all these components and the rest of the enterprise. OPC is the solution - it solves the problem of communication between devices, controllers and applications. It is a standardized approach to data connectivity that does not get caught up in the usual custom-drive based connectivity problems. Read this guide to learn the ABCs of OPC and how it can solve your data connectivity issues!

    MatrikonOPC
    09/09/2009
  • Delivering the Power of DCS in a Small System

    Many manufacturing plants are driven to lower product costs and increase quality and flexibility while maintaining focus on compliance and safety. While automation plays an essential role in meeting business needs, some solutions can add complexity and costs, thereby reducing the return on investment. The ideal solution provides the agility required without sacrificing reliability and life–cycle costs. Download this resource to learn how Experion LS can be the ideal solution for your plant.

    Honeywell
    08/20/2009
  • Benefits of State Based Control

    State Based Control is a plant automation control design based on the principle that all process facilities operate in recognized, definable Process States that represent a variety of normal and abnormal conditions of the process. State Based Control, implemented with the latest developments in object-based technologies, delivers direct benefits to its adopters in a variety of Operational Excellence categories. It results in productivity increases, higher asset utilization of both people and process, automated responses and recovery for abnormal conditions and provides an environment for knowledge capture directly into the control design.

    David Huffman, ABB Inc.
    03/23/2009
  • The Six Most Common PID Configuration Errors: How to Find and Fix Them

    The PID control loop is one of the fundamental workhorses of the process industries. Day in and day out, millions of PID loops strive to keep processes safe, stable and profitable, but there is a secret, known only to control engineers and technicians: Many of these control loops are not properly configured, and the consequences could be devastating. This paper identifies the most common PID configuration issues and provides techniques to help plant-based personnel to find and fix these issues.

    ExperTune
    12/12/2008
  • The Rise of the Programmable Automation Computer

    It was only thirty years ago that most industrial processes were controlled either by hardwired relay logic or analog loop controllers. In the last thirty years, we’ve come very far from hardwired relays and analog controllers, and computers have changed beyond the belief of anyone in the late 1970s. Today, this development continues with the rise in PACs. This white paper discusses this growth and what the future may hold.

    Advantech
    10/16/2008
  • GE Fanuc’s Proficy Becomes Reality for Collaborative Process Automation

    It is a significant competitive advantage for an automation supplier to offer an open and collaborative production environment that embraces standards and can address the full scope of automation and control applications from process to discrete and motion applications. Download this white paper to learn more about collaborative process automation.

    GE Fanuc
    03/10/2008
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