White Papers

on 'Calibration'

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  • Purge and Pressurization White Paper

    Purge and pressurization is an alternative hazardous location protection concept that allows lesser rated equipment to be used in hazardous areas by segregating the equipment from the hazardous material.

    Pentair
    11/17/2014
  • Best Practices for Flow Calibration Management

    Failure to calibrate flowmeters can negatively impact performance, while calibrating too frequently can result in excessive costs without providing any benefits. So the question is, how do you determine if calibration is needed and what the frequency should be? Download this white paper to find out the answer!

    Endress+Hauser
    03/04/2014
  • Calibration in Hazardous Areas

    This article discusses calibration in hazardous areas and what everyone needs to be aware of before entering into a hazardous area with calibration equipment. Other topics covered are the background of flammable and combustible liquids, definition of a hazardous area, the types of relevant industries, the different levels of zones, regulations, equipment classification and various other related practical issues.

    Beamex
    12/09/2013
  • Successfully Executing a System Integration Project

    For process manufacturers today, having a reliable, seamlessly integrated set of IT systems across the plant, or across multiple sites, is critical to business efficiency, profitability and growth. Beamex has introduced the Business Bridge mdash; a standardized, but configurable software solution for connecting Beamex CMX calibration management system to an enterprise resource planning (ERP) or computerized maintenance management system (CMMS).

    Beamex
    05/25/2013
  • The Hidden Cost of Low Cost Calibrations

    So you think you cut down your cost? The decision to purchase a calibration service is often based on price alone. This price-only approach to purchasing can be a Trojan horse, hiding unexpected costs and a multitude of problems. This overview presents information to help you evaluate your calibration service provider's calibration offerings and why the lowest cost calibration may not offer the best value.

    Fluke
    03/27/2013
  • Discussion of Flowmeter Accuracy Specifications

    Understanding the accuracy of a given flowmeter is an important field but it can also be misleading as different specifications are used to explain how accurate a flowmeter measurement actually measures. This paper discusses the different specifications and interprets the impact of them.

    Why deal with accuracy?

    The reasons for dealing with flowmeter accuracy specifications are many-folded. One important reason is from an economical point of view. The more accurate a flowmeter can measure, the more money you will save as the medium is measured with only very little inaccurately.

    Another reason is in terms of dosing, where a given amount of a medium is added. This must be done with a high level of precision and the accuracy is thus important in order to dose correctly. This is critical in certain industries such as in pharma or chemical.

    A third reason is in terms of billing purposes. By performing with good accuracy, you know exactly how much fluid flows into the process. Thereby, you are able to determine the right price of the product and thereby bill the customers correctly.

    Therefore, knowing how much that flows through your system is paramount in order to make a profitable and solid business. You need to rely on a precise measurement with good accuracy. However, good accuracy must be obtained not only in one measurement, but in all measurements independent of the time.

    Siemens
    01/21/2013
  • Parlez Vous Calibration?

    Have a question about your test and measurement products? Start here at our "Test & Measurement Tool Users Community."

    Fluke
    10/15/2012
  • The Benefits of Using a Documenting Calibrator

    One of the benefits using a documenting calibrator is to be able to determine how accurate an instrument or sensor is. However, many times in the calibration process, documentation is a step that process manufacturers skip because they lack the resources and the time to do so. Although most instruments are very accurate these days, regulatory bodies often need to know just how inaccurate a particular instrument is and whether it drifts in and out of a specified tolerance over time. Download this white paper and learn how using a documenting calibrator can can help cut down costs and time, minimize manual errors while improving efficiency, accuracy and quality in the calibration process.

    Beamex
    09/10/2012
  • Improving Calibration with HART Diagnostics

    The widespread use of digital instrumentation with a digital communications protocol calls for new thinking about the traditional tools used by technicians for instrument maintenance and calibration. HART protocol instrumentation is by far the most used of this type of system. The HART Maintenance Device would be just such a tool, providing basic communications and diagnostic capabilities to support the maintenance and troubleshooting of HART instruments.

    Martel Electronics
    05/14/2012
  • How Often Should Instruments Be Calibrated?

    Plants can improve their efficiency and reduce costs by performing calibration history trend analysis. By doing it, a plant is able to define which instruments can be calibrated less frequently and which should be calibrated more frequently. Calibration history trend analysis is only possible with calibration software that provides this functionality. Download this white paper to learn how to use calibration history trend analysis to adjust calibration intervals of plant instrumentation.

    Beamex
    04/02/2012
  • When and How to Inspect, Clean and Calibrate pH Sensors

    This paper will address
    - Knowing when to do a pH sensor calibration versus a calibration check
    - How to properly clean a pH sensor
    - How to perform a pH sensor calibration
    - A decision tree for step by step guidance

    The phrase in the above title is actually incorrect in its sequence of wording. All pH readings are supposed to be taken and accepted only when the pH sensor is clean. After all, a contaminated pH sensor may yield an incorrect reading. So one must make sure the sensor is clean before doing a calibration. Once a pH sensor is installed in the process and operating, how do you determine when it is time to take the sensor out of the process and do a cleaning, or a calibration? Does one perform both a cleaning and a calibration or just a cleaning, or just a calibration, or does one just perform a calibration check in buffers or...?

    This is something that can be quite confusing, especially when the operational practices and procedures documented by your company's Quality Control or Environmental Practices department may not be specific enough when they describe the procedure or the timing on when to conduct the pH calibration and maintenance. Inversely, the procedures may be too specific, detailing many more procedures and operations than are actually required.

    In practical terms, users must develop their own maintenance and calibration schedule. This schedule is accomplished by taking the pH sensor out of the process after a set amount of time, perhaps after a day or two to perform a visual inspection of the sensor. If after inspection you find no debris or fouling on the electrode and reference surfaces with the naked eye, rinse the sensor off in distilled water and perform a buffer check.

    Fred Kohlmann, Endress+Hauser
    02/27/2012
  • Calibrating Temperature Instruments

    The most commonly and most frequently measurable variable in industry is temperature. Every temperature measurement is different, which makes the temperature calibration process slow and expensive. While standards determine accuracy to which manufacturers must comply, they nevertheless do not determine the permanency of accuracy. Therefore, the user must be sure to verify the permanency of accuracy. If temperature is a significant measurable variable from the point of view of the process, it is necessary to calibrate the instrument and the temperature sensor.

    Download this white paper to learn how to calibrate temperature instruments and why this is so important.

    Beamex
    07/14/2011
  • Paperless Calibration Improves Quality and Cuts Costs

    Paper is part of our everyday lives - whether in the workplace or at home. Global consumption of paper has grown 400% in the last 40 years. As manufacturing companies, our consumption of paper is far higher than it needs to be, especially given that there are technologies, software and electronic devices readily available today which render the use of paper in the workplace unnecessary. Calibrating instruments is an enormous task that consumes vast amounts of paperwork. Far too many automation companies still use paper-based calibration systems, which means they are missing out on the benefits of moving towards a paperless calibration system.

    Download this white paper to learn more about the benefits of moving towards a paperless calibration system.

    Beamex
    07/14/2011
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