White Papers

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  • Alarm management for regulated industries

    This article (.pdf) from CEPmagazine.org focuses on the regulatory drivers for alarm management and summarizes some key best practices, and challenges the process automation industry on things it can do to help implement more effective alarm systems.

    CEPMagazine.org
    06/20/2005
  • Alarm Management for Pipelines

    This paper looks at the pipeline industry in the broader context of process industry alarm management and how the best practices of the process industry apply to the pipeline industry.

    Matrikon
    02/01/2008
  • Alarm Management for Pipelines

    This paper looks at the pipeline industry in the broader context of process industry alarm management and how the best practices of the process industry apply to the pipeline industry.

    Matrikon
    01/31/2008
  • Alarm Management Blueprint: Achieving Pacesetter Status

    The Purpose of This Document is to Provide an Overview of How Facilities Are Leveraging Their Investment in Alarm Management (AM) Technology for Maximum Benefit to Production, Productivity and Safety

    Matrikon Inc.
    05/07/2008
  • Alarm and Event Analysis for Batch Process Improvement

    Alarm and event analysis has long been used for improving process operation. However since alarms are usually generated and displayed based on physical equipment, alarm analysis has been difficult to perform on a batch basis. In this paper, we focus on the interrelation of alarm/message notification and operator reaction in a batch process and analyze them systematically according to S88.01 Models and Terminology. Balance patterns of alarm/message notification and operator reactions are visually analyzed. Batch based analysis is done by grouping and filtering alarm and event data by master recipe, procedural hierarchy, and batch unit. This makes it easy to find and improve spurious alarms and inefficient operator habits. In a brief experience in a pharmaceutical plant, spurious alarms have been reduced by approximately 30% and smoother operation procedures have been implemented.

    Yoshitaka Yuki, Manager, Yokogawa Corporation of America; Jim Parks, Instrument Engineer, Lonza Inc.
    08/28/2008
  • Air Products Realizes Multiple Significant Gains with Alarm Management

    Air Products was looking to make three improvements to their plant performance: a reduction in off-spec product, an increase in capacity by reducing cycle time, and due to reassignment of duties of the control-room staff, a better way to present and prioritize alarms. Download this case study and discover how Matrikon Alarm Manager solved these challenges and made substantial improvements with direct operational and bottom-line benefits.

    Matrikon
    05/28/2008
  • Age is No Issue

    Evolution of automation systems to improve return on assets

    ABB
    01/31/2008
  • Advantages of a PC Based HART Communicator

    It's now time to upgrade to a new HART Communicator. Your old hand held HART Communicator is obsolete and receives limited support. You shop around and find that it costs between $3000 and $7000 for a new hand held HART Communicator. A Google search reveals a PC based alternative. Will the PC alternative perform as required? What should you look for?

    The PC based HART Communicator has been around for many years, but until recently it has not been able to replace the hand held HART communicator. The main reason is that it could not communicate at the DD level with all the devices in the DD library. Recent developments have eliminated that problem and now is a good time to review the capabilities of a PC based HART Communicator.

    ProComSol
    12/01/2009
  • Advances in Low Voltage Motor Control Center (MCC) Technology Help Reduce Arc-Flash Hazards and Minimize Risks

    Selecting the right MCC equipment leads to improved plant safety, helping protect people and capital investments.

    Measures to increase equipment and personnel safety in manufacturing are reflected in new approaches and technologies designed to help minimize the risk of workplace dangers. One rapidly growing area of focus is reducing the potentially serious hazards associated with arc-flash events. This white paper examines the causes of arc flash, discusses the standards guiding arc-flash safety and details the role arc-resistant motor control centers (MCCs) play in helping contain arc energy. It also highlights the key features of an effective arc-resistant MCC design.

    Managing safety hazards and reducing risks are top priorities for manufacturers across all sectors of industry. With a multitude of potential dangers and new ones continuously emerging, companies must be diligent in their ongoing efforts while considering new approaches and technologies to improve plant safety. One rapidly growing area of focus is implementing techniques and practices designed to reduce hazards and minimize risk for workers who must enter an area with an electrical arc-flash potential.

    Rockwell Automation
    04/07/2010
  • Advanced Process Control: Quick and Easy Energy Savings

    In today's manufacturing environment, there is an urgency to increase operating efficiencies, and to do it quickly. One area of improvement that can produce immediate results is reducing energy consumption. It's good for the environment and it's good for the bottom line. "Energy management," therefore, has become a common best practice, but there is more there than meets the eye. Typically it implies rigorously modeling all or a major portion of the plant, coupled with the use of real-time optimization technology. While this approach has been used successfully, there are other simpler, faster options for reducing energy consumption in a manufacturing plant. Learn what these options are.

    Paul Kesseler, Manager, Advanced Process Control Practice, Global Consulting Group, Invensys Operations Management
    03/25/2010
  • Advanced Control of Batch Reactor Temperature

    This paper describes the application of an advanced model predictive adaptive controller to the problem of batch reactor temperature control. Although a great deal of work has been done to improve reactor throughput using batch sequence control, the control of the actual reactor temperature remains a difficult problem for many operators of these processes. Temperature control on these systems is difficult for conventional Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers because the response is characterized bynan open loop integrator with long delay and time constant. Temperature control is important as many chemical reactions are sensitive to temperature for formation of desired products and reaction rates can be highly temperature dependent. The applications discussed in this paper include a PVC reactor and an Ethoxylated fatty acid reactor. In each case, the variability of the reactor temperature was reduced by 60% or more. Improved temperature control permitted operation at higher reaction temperatures with higher sustained feed rates of reactants and catalysts while remaining within product temperature limits. Batch cycle times were reduced by as much as 35% due to the higher sustained reaction rates. The applications demonstrate the attractive economics for optimization of batch reactors with model predictive controls and highlight the opportunity for tremendous improvements in batch consistency, reduced batch cycle times, and improved productivity.

    Mihai Huzmezan, University of British Columbia, Pulp and Paper Centre; Bill Gough, Sava Kovac, Universal Dynamics Technologies Inc.
    08/25/2008
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