White Papers

61-80 of 1174 < first | | | last >
  • WBF XML Schemas

    This paper provides background on, and an overview of, the soon to be released WBF XML batch and enterprise-control system schemas. The schemas consist of two sets, one is intended to provide for the exchange of batch data and is based upon the ANSI/ISA 88 standard. The second is intended to serve as a basis for exchanging data between enterprise and control systems and is based upon the ANSI/ISA 95 standard. The organization of each set is described along with examples on how they can be used.

    David Emerson, Senior Systems Architect, Yokogawa
    08/25/2008
  • Waterford Township Water Treatmeant

    Alexi Beck Gray Visits Waterford Township Department of Public Works and Learns How They Treat and Transport Water to Its Over Seventy-Four Thousand Residents

    Opto22
    05/07/2008
  • Volumetric & Totalizer Devices

    ABB's Flow Measurement Handbook has helped generations of instrumentation practitioners navigate the application ins and outs of industrial flow measurement devices. Its latest edition entitled "Industrial Flow Measurement -- Basics and Practice," is available here in manageable chapters, downloadable as PDFs; this week we feature "Operating principles and application of flow instrumentation based on positive displacement, turbine, vortex and swirl phenomena."

    ABB
    06/11/2012
  • Visual Management

    Kaizen, lean manufacturing, six-sigma, total quality management, continuous improvement - all of these terms refer to the efforts of companies as they strive to become more competitive in a global economy. While various strategies are implemented in order to improve productivity, they all have two things in common: the collection of key performance indicators (KPIs) and the communication of those KPIs to the people who can most affect improvement. This data however, doesn't do any good unless everyone can see it and that's where visual management comes into play. Download this white paper to learn how visual management techniques can be deployed very quickly, without a huge investment in software or changes to existing processes. Learn how visual management can increase your company's profitability.

    Red Lion
    01/09/2012
  • Virtualization Reduces the Cost of Supporting Open Industrial Control Systems

    Applying virtualization technology to open industrial control systems reduces lifecycle costs and improves manageability. Virtualization helps reduce hardware and operating system (OS) changes, improve computer platform resource utilization and makes the system easier to maintain. Read this white paper to learn more.

    Honeywell
    02/01/2010
  • Virtualization Is a Reality

    Thin clients are performance heavyweights in industrial applications, cutting up-front and lifecycle costs while improving reliability and security. Virtualization and thin clients are two of the leading trends in computing, both in the commercial and industrial sectors. For industrial applications, virtualization and thin clients intersect when thin clients are used as a key component in virtualization strategies for process control and MES. In this white paper, you will learn about the benefits of virtualization, the interrelationship between both virtualization and thin-client technologies, why the thin-client approach is often the least expensive solution, and advantages of thin clients over PCs.

    Pepperl+Fuchs
    01/16/2013
  • Virtualization for Process Automation Systems

    Process engineers are turning to virtualization to extend the lifecycle of their control systems. Virtualization provides hardware independence, which helps to improve system longevity, and increase system flexibility, scalability and uptime. This white paper will describe how to build and deploy a virtual process automation system using VMware virtualization software.

    Rockwell Automation
    04/05/2013
  • Virtual Reality Training Program

    A Comprehensive Plant Crew Training Solution Improving Process Reliability and Safety

    One of the key challenges that capitalintensive industries will face over the next five years is replacing the gray-haired workforce with the computer-savvy/gaming generation. High-fidelity operator trainer simulators that represent the production process, control system and the control room interface have proved to be very effective for control room operations training. However, for the remaining 50% of the plant start-up procedures that are executed in the field, no fully interactive training environment has been available - until now.

    Industries like oil and gas, refining and power companies need to institutionalize their workforce knowledge in more efficient and effective ways. Leveraging Virtual Reality (VR) models to improve time-to competency in critical areas like safety, environment protection systems, knowledge, performance training, and reliability provides a vehicle to rapidly train the new workforce in ways that align with their interests and skills.

    With continuing advances in hardware and software techniques Virtual Reality (VR) is accessible today as the best aid to multimedia training, process design, maintenance, safety, etc. which are currently based around conventional 2-Dimensional (2-D) equipment views.

    The real time rendering of equipment views puts demands on processor time and so the use of high fidelity simulators is becoming more and more of a standard in process understanding and training. Within many VR commercial projects in the past, the results have either been unrealistically slow or oversimplified to the detriment of the solution effectiveness. As the technology continues to develop, these issues have been eliminated, giving way to a new process simulation era that is based on commercially standard IT hardware.

    IVRP (Immersive Virtual Reality Plant) now provides a large range of effective multimedia aids that are easily and economically accessible to support design, training, maintenance or safety in the process industry by linking the power of dynamic simulation - DYNSYM - to VR applications and tools.

    Invensys has filed patents for the solution outlined in this paper.

    Invensys, Maurizio Rovaglio, Tobias Scheele and Norbert Jung
    10/25/2010
  • Video Process Monitoring

    The white paper describes the hardware and software elements of a video process monitoring system, how it uses the plant’s industrial network to transmit video to the control system and how the video images appear on HMI screens.

    Steve Rubin, President & CEO, Longwatch Inc.
    09/10/2008
  • Video Process Monitoring

    Today, there are two primary ways to monitor a process: in person, by walking around the plant, or from a control room via an HMI screen. But there is a third way: Watching the process via camera monitors that put images directly on the HMI screen or onto a cell phone or PDA. That way, you don't have to wonder what's happening at the process unit. You can see it.

    Steve Rubin, President & CEO, Longwatch, Inc.
    08/15/2008
  • Video Integrates with SCADA system to Improve Security at Madison,Wisconsin, Water Utility

    On September 11, 2001, America was attacked by terrorists and the United States quickly acknowledged vulnerabilities at our airports, borders, food supply and water supply systems. Soon after, the government required vulnerability assessments (VAs) for all municipalities – with large cities required to go first. In 2002, Madison Water Utility (MWU) in Madison, Wisconsin, underwent its VA and saw a need for video cameras at many locations, including 32 remote sites.
    Two obstacles stood in the way of Madison meeting this need:
    - Technology--whose cameras, network and communication system? How can video work with our SCADA system?
    - Money-- who will pay to protect Madison’s water supply?

    Al Larson P.E., Principal Engineer Madison Water Utility, Madison, WI
    02/24/2009
  • Video Helps in a Tough Economy

    With the economy slowing down on a global basis, managers are reluctant to spend money or move forward on prior plans. Indeed, many companies are postponing or cancelling projects and many have begun “cost cutting measures” that almost always mean “job eliminations.”Reducing costs is a responsible management action; the goal is to protect the return on the investors’ equity. Video can provide a solution to many of the issues that remain, even when people are laid off or factories are closed.

    Steve Rubin, President & CEO, Longwatch
    03/12/2009
  • Video Analytics and Security

    Using video data to improve both safety and ROI.

    Most companies are gathering trillions of bytes of data, day after day, at no small cost, and then doing very little with it. Worse still, the data often is not serving its primary function very cost-effectively.

    The "culprit," so to speak, is video surveillance data, the information captured by the video cameras that are used throughout most modern facilities.

    But the situation is changing rapidly, thanks to an application called Video Analytics. This white paper looks at the new software technology, and how it can be used to leverage video data for better security and business performance.

    Schneider Electric
    03/05/2010
  • Utilization of SCADA networks for video surveillance

    This paper outlines a new technological development that allows the transmission of video images using low bandwidth networks for protection against sabotage and attack on our nation's critical water system infrastructure.

    Longwatch
    05/05/2006
  • Using XML with S88.02

    The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) was released by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in 1998 and has experienced rapid worldwide acceptance. When the SP88 committee started work on the S88.02 exchange tables XML technology was not available for consideration and relational database table technology was used as a basis for batch data exchange. As applications come to market based on S88.02 it is important to examine the newer XML technology for suitability for batch data exchange. This paper provides a brief overview of XML and discusses how it can be used for batch data exchange. As an example an application that converts a control system's proprietary master recipes to and from XML is discussed. Lessons learned about the use of XML versus relational database technology are presented as well as possibilities for future uses of XML with batch control.

    David Emerson, Sr. System Architect, Yokogawa Corporation of America
    08/26/2008
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