April 2005 Issue

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Articles

  • Process analyzers avoid meeting standards

    Senior Technical Editor Rich Merritt's Product Roundup of process analyzer systems and components finds that most manufacturers are avoiding NeSSI and PAT standards like the plague.

  • Jimmy Neutron meets the Woz

    Dick Morley, father of the modern PLC, believes a renaissance in industry technology will be the thrust for the next several decades. Will we, the control engineering geeks, be ready for simple innovations in the Age of Invention?

  • Three decades of DCS technology

    Distributed control system technology and its pioneers have had a profound effect on our profession and should be recognized, according to Around the Loop columnist Terrence K. McMahon.

  • Digital data recorders deliver

    This month's Technically Speaking column compares mechanical, analog and digital recorders for data acquisition and concludes that local data logging can be the easiest way to satisfy regulatory requirements.

  • So much to learn, so little time

    Process control authority Bela Liptak brings in specialists from his cadre of co-authors to answer a reader's question. Find out which books and online courses they recommend for continued education.

  • Patent infringement case remains a tangled web

    In the April issue of CONTROL magazine, Managing Editor Steve Kuehn reports on how Solaia may have finally met its match now that it has faced off against Rockwell Automation in a U.S. patent court case.

  • Can a cheap flowmeter be good?

    Editor in Chief Walt Boyes finds that it isn’t the cost of the device but the durability that engineers are looking for. And it doesn’t have to be accurate, either, as long as it is very repeatable.

  • Fermilab: Can cheap flowmeters be good?

    CONTROL Editor in Chief Walt Boyes takes a look at how an anti-matter factory works at one of the largest high energy physics labs in the world, and why flowmeters are critical to the operation of the plant.

  • How to run a plant when expertise is lost

    When plant institutional knowledge leaves, process control soon follows. How do you keep your plant running if nobody remembers how? Senior Technical Editor Rich Merritt reports.