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Control Valve Technology Library Resource Center

Control Valves Technology LibraryThis nifty resource helps you find anything and everything you need to know about control valves without having to endlessly surf the web. It provides descriptions and general information for all valve technologies used in process control and automation applications, and allows you to view online intelligence reports, white papers, articles, and technical book abstracts on all things related to control valves.

Control Valve Technology

A control valve regulates the flow or pressure of a fluid. Control valves normally respond to signals generated by independent devices such as flow meters or temperature gauges. Control valves are normally fitted with actuators and positioners. Pneumatically-actuated globe valves are widely used for control purposes in many industries, although quarter-turn types such as (modified) ball and butterfly valves are also used.

Control valves can also work with hydraulic actuators (also known as hydraulic pilots). These types of valves are also known as Automatic Control Valves. The hydraulic actuators will respond to changes of pressure or flow and will open/close the valve. Automatic Control Valves do not require an external power source, meaning that the fluid pressure is enough to open and close the valve. Automatic control valves include: pressure reducing valves, flow control valves, back-pressure sustaining valves, altitude valves, and relief valves. An altitude valve controls the level of a tank. The altitude valve will remain open while the tank is not full and it will close when the tanks reaches its maximum level. The opening and closing of the valve requires no external power source (electric, pneumatic, or man power), it is done automatically, hence its name.

Control Valves

Control Valve Technology LibraryA control valve regulates the flow or pressure of a fluid. Control valves normally respond to signals generated by independent devices such as flow meters or temperature gauges. Control valves are normally fitted with actuators and positioners. Pneumatically-actuated globe valves are widely used for control purposes in many industries, although quarter-turn types such as (modified) ball and butterfly valves are also used.

Control valves can also work with hydraulic actuators (also known as hydraulic pilots). These types of valves are also known as Automatic Control Valves. The hydraulic actuators will respond to changes of pressure or flow and will open/close the valve. Automatic Control Valves do not require an external power source, meaning that the fluid pressure is enough to open and close the valve. Automatic control valves include: pressure reducing valves, flow control valves, back-pressure sustaining valves, altitude valves, and relief valves. An altitude valve controls the level of a tank. The altitude valve will remain open while the tank is not full and it will close when the tanks reaches its maximum level. The opening and closing of the valve requires no external power source (electric, pneumatic, or man power), it is done automatically, hence its name.

Control Valve Handbook, Fourth Edition
The latest update to this classic reference tool, also known as Fisher's Little Black Book, is now available online. This newest version, a staple in the industry for more than 30 years, presents information on control valve performance and new technologies, and includes input from experts in the field. View, save or download your complimentary copy of this invaluable reference tool here.
Control Valve Handbook, Fourth Edition


Submit Articles on Control Valves
We welcome contributions from engineers and technically minded people. Your articles can be anything to do with a control valve or anything to do with the subject of valves that you think will help educate others. Article submission can be in Word, pdf, or html format. If your article is useful to other people, we will add it to our site. Send your articles to wboyes@putman.net.

Articles

White Papers: In Depth Research

  • Effective Compliance with IEC 61508 When Selecting Solenoid Valves for Safety Systems

    Author: Asco Pneumatics/Emerson Process Management

    Regulatory modifications in 2010 have raised important issues in design and use of industrial safety systems. Certain changes in IEC 61508, now being widely implemented, mean that designers and users who desire full compliance must give new consideration t

  • Improved Diagnostics from Decentralized Solenoid Valves and I/O Systems

    Author: Festo

    Information about the health of a control system, the I/O systems, field devices and final control elements can be critical for plant operation and uptime. Timely diagnostic information can mean the difference between a quick repair and hours or days of un

  • Technology Transfer Brings New Life to Electric Control Valve Actuation

    Author: Exlar

    The limitations of traditional electric actuators have an impact on the life of the system. The most common problem is exceeding the rated duty cycle, causing the motor to burn out. A study done by ExxonMobil and presented in October 2012 at Coking.Com ide

  • Weigh Your Instrumentation Options: Switch, Transmitter or Hybrid?

    Author: Control

    For decades, process instrumentation specifiers have faced the decision whether to use a mechanical switch or a continuous transmitter for a given application. Either type of instrument can be used to effectively control industrial processes and protect eq