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Optimize with the Industrial Internet of Things

June 17, 2021
Gain advice from experts, explore case studies, and gain insight to tools and strategies that could be useful to you

It's just chips, software, Ethernet and transfer control protocol/Internet protocol (TCP/IP). Even its name, Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), is more complicated than necessary. It's just Internet—and whatever anyone wants to pile on top to communicate, move data, crunch numbers, perform tasks, make better decisions and optimize processes.  

In this series, executive editor Jim Montague reports that the hurdles to successful implementation of the Industrial Internet of Things are now easier to overcome with the help of key concepts and strategies that are proving useful by differentiating themselves and streamlining users' efforts to gain the most value from their Internet connections.

In the articles below, gain advice from experts, explore case studies, and gain insight to tools and strategies that could be useful to you. 

Fewer hurdles to IIoT

Several key concepts and strategies are proving to be the most useful, differentiating themselves from less helpful methods, and streamlining users' efforts to gain the most value from their Internet connections. City of Decatur, Ark., H2O Innovation and Automation Station offer some advice on optimizing with IIoT. Read more. 

Zoom up and out from control

Just as 'Rome wasn't built in a day,' today's streamlined IIoT tools must still be tailored to fit the needs of the individual processes where they're deployed, and every IIoT project must address cybersecurity. Read more.

Labor-saving IIoT tools and protocols

The list of software, protocols and other devices for implementing the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is always growing and diversifying. Here's the latest update. Read more.

IIoT builds new bridges to new adventures

Engenuity Inc., a provider control automation and data integration for oil and gas and other industries, explains how it uses IIoT hardware and software from Opto22 and Inductive Automation to integrate data, automate controls, and validate pressure testing of blowout preventers. Read more. 

Use IIoT to follow fleets of assets and applications

Based on the usual "if one if good, more will be better" reasoning, some users are starting to deploy multiple IIoT applications to monitor and manage larger groups of often far-flung applications and plants. Kennedy Industries explains how it uses network monitoring software to manage data centers, redundant servers, firewalls, VPNs, access points and cybersecurity functions for more than 70 water/wastewater facilities in Michigan. Read more.

Working closer with water/wastewater clients

To improve access to process data in water/wastewater plants in Japan, Nishihara Environment Co., Ltd. in Tokyo and Nissin Systems Co. in Kyoto recently developed a solution and service called N-Share, which combines DataHub technology from Skkynet and iBress cloud-computing service from BellChild Ltd. in Osaka. Here's how N-Share allows Nishihara to work closer with its client facilities, share data in real-time with regulators and operating firms, and save everyone time and revenue. Read more.

Defining IIoT for practical purposes

Because the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) spans so many technical areas, it helps potential users to understand how others see it, which can point out the most useful ways to implement it in individual applications. Here are the expert assessments of several suppliers. Read more.

About the author: Jim Montague
About the Author

Jim Montague | Executive Editor

Jim Montague is executive editor of Control.